Articles

Intervention: Boxing Community Spreads Awareness for Addiction (Season 20) | A&E


[tense music] [soft music] -[Jacob pants]
-[Chuck] Move, good moves. That left hook
when you come out and turn in, -be more committed to it.
-[pants] There you go. That’s it, Jacob. Diesel Fit
is a community centered gym, here in the heart of Kensington. Our primary purpose
is to bring the community together in a safe
and healthy environment, but mostly, it is
to work with the kids. Turn out for the hook,
one, two, three. -[pants]
-Good hook. I have 19 years of sobriety,
and boxing was my outlet. It just helped me so much
socially, and my mission, my goal is to cut
the pipeline off. Have these children
have to go another way. -There’s my boy. How are you?
-Yo, how you doing? [laughs] It’s so good to see each other. [Chuck] Tony Luke
is a guy in the community. He’s major out there
with the social media. Listen, I wanna talk to you
about possibly doing another event
like we did before. Well, come on,
let’s talk about it. [Tony] In 2017, me and a couple
of friends of mine started the hashtag
brown and white initiative. Originally, it was designed
to get people who’ve lost a loved one to post a picture
of them on social media, with the hashtag
brown and white, which is named after the two
primary colours of heroine. Then it wound up turning
into, not just that, but a support system
for those struggling. This time I really
want to integrate the addiction end of it,
with the boxing. I wanna get families involved. Instead of just
speaking on addiction, we do more about speaking
about families, and about how important it is
to keep families together. How important it is
to have fathers and mothers, and aunts and uncles. I’m 100% on board with getting
these kids off the street, and getting them
into programs like yours. I needed to be educated, about spending more time
with my son. I’m not saying that if I were
to spend more time with him, he might still be here, but I do know that, as a father, I would’ve been able
to do more for him. -Sure.
-When my son, Tony, passed away. I figured, if I can get people to post photos
of their loved one, to show that there’s no shame
in someone that they loved, battling this horrific
disease, passed away, To let the world know,
they are not a statistic. So I was hoping that families
wouldn’t feel ashamed anymore. That they would be educated
in knowing about addiction. [Chuck] Why don’t we kinda
focus it on inviting families to a dinner show, if you will? -I like that.
-So while they’re eating, we’ll have speakers,
and talk about the family, talk about addiction, talk
about the health and resources
that are available, and then
when they’re done eating, and done on the speakers,
they can come over -and watch a couple of boxers.
-I like that. Now we get people
that aren’t like-minded. -Exactly.
-Because we’ve already got the people that are like-minded, it’s changing the minds
of people that don’t understand, or don’t get it. We are garnering with Chuck,
because what he does here, is so important. It’s hitting the ground,
it’s on the street, it’s these little differences
that make huge changes. That’s how we knock it out. That’s it, brother,
God bless you. [tense music]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *