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Whatever Happened To Boxing’s Biggest Promoter

Whatever Happened To Boxing’s Biggest Promoter


Don King, boxing’s biggest promoter with the
biggest hair, rose to fame after staging the “Rumble in the Jungle” and the “Thrilla in
Manila.” And after years spent working with the industry’s
heaviest hitters, King became as well-known as some of his clients, even inspiring movie
characters. “Gentlemen whoa whoa we’re getting carried
away” It’s been a while since we’ve heard King shout
“Only in America.” Between multiple lawsuits, two cases of homicide,
and a sullied reputation, King hasn’t been in the spotlight as much lately. “I’ve been relatively quiet, you must admit.” Here’s how Don King has been keeping busy. During the glory days of Mike Tyson, Don King was always at his side, but Tyson eventually
discovered King was always in his pockets, too. In 1998, Tyson sued King for $100 million,
claiming that King had been skimming money off the fighter’s purses for years. Tyson also alleged that King made him sign
contracts while he was still in jail, never giving him the opportunity to seek a lawyer’s
advice on the matter. “Then I got caught up with piece of s— Don
King, who’s just a wretched…a wretched, slimy, reptilian motherf—–.” In 2004, they reached a settlement. Tyson dropped his $100 million suit in exchange
for a $14 million payment from King. It wasn’t much of a victory for Tyson since
all of the money had to go toward settling his massive debt to creditors, the IRS, and
his ex-wife. But the two have since been able to share
a room without much spectacle, so at least there’s that. Don King’s criminal record might not reflect it, but he’s been responsible for at least
two people’s untimely demises. King shot a man who was trying to rob one
of his gambling houses in 1954, but it was ruled a “justifiable homicide,” and he got
off scot-free. The second incident took place 13 years later,
when he curbstomped an employee into an early grave because he owed him $600. King was convicted of non-negligent manslaughter,
and he served four years in prison. His record was later expunged because Governor
Jim Rhodes pardoned the crime in 1984. Ohio had so completely forgiven him that the
city of Cleveland would name a street in King’s honor. In fact, the very same street where one of
those bodies was found was proposed to become “Don King Way.” “If you stomp a guy to death I don’t think
you should get a street named after you.” However, the city council was split over the
idea, and after a lot of bad press, decided to keep King’s name off of the former crime
scene. It’s been a while since King’s represented any top-level talent. So when he got the opportunity to pitch himself
to the Ukrainian boxing duo the Klitschko Brothers, he pulled out all the stops. The documentary Klitschko shows the brothers’
first meeting with King, just after Wladimir won a gold medal in 1996. In the video, King sweet talks the two, clearly
trying to get them to sign a possibly unfavorable contract… “I’m gonna make sure he gets taken care of
because I’m the money that comes off is about making money”
To prove that King’s a serious person and an artist more than a businessman, he sits
down at his piano and begins to play. At first, it’s pretty impressive, until the
Klitschkos realize that it’s a player piano and King is faking the whole thing. King’s choice to put on his little player
piano show did not please the brothers, so they left and never went back, stymying King’s
chance of representing the next heavyweight champions. Though King’s name is divisive for many reasons, his work within the field of boxing is still
pretty legendary. So, in 2013, he was inducted into the Nevada
Boxing Hall of Fame. Former clients Mike Tyson and Larry Holmes
were in the same class of inductees, though both had previously sued King for stealing
their money. It’s not too surprising that the Hall of Fame
was willing to look beyond King’s checkered past and celebrate his positive contributions
to the industry, however, considering some of the other inductees’ criminal histories. King may not be promoting the big names of boxing anymore, but that doesn’t mean he’s
out of the game. King still shows up to fights with the men
in his stable, though the fights are a lot smaller. King will wave his 17 flags, shout his catch
phrases, then scoot out the backdoor when his guy loses. The once-bustling Don King Productions now
resides in a simple building in Florida that serves as a museum to his past triumphs and
few signs of future success. One of his biggest clients, Eric Molina, only
made $250,000 on his WBC heavyweight championship fight, a far cry from the millions King used
to rake in for his top-level clientele. But the man has caused hype, excitement, and
controversy to the world of boxing for years. Boxing has left him behind, but he still clings
to his persona to get some final moments in the spotlight. “I ain’t asking you to love me, JUST RESPECT
ME!” Thanks for watching! Click the Grunge icon to subscribe to our
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100 thoughts on “Whatever Happened To Boxing’s Biggest Promoter”

  1. The realety strands but
    we have not been able
    to watch great fights
    in boxing anymore with out
    DON KING PROMOTIONS.
    DON KING WAS THE BEST
    PROMOTER FOR ALL BOXING
    FANS.

  2. I'm glad he's gone.
    Don King was not the kind of person that you could trust all the time, nor is he the kind of person that you could mistrust all of the time. Whenever he shook your hand you may pull your hand back and find a couple of $100.00 bills in your hand. Then again, you can shake his hand and you might be missing two or three fingers afterwards. You couldn't love him all the time, you couldn't hate him all the time. You couldn't like him all the time, you couldn't dislike him all the time. He was very controversial. Having said that, he did promote some of the greatest fights in history. But he was a scoundrel.

  3. All the Boxers and people he ripped why didn't At least One of them Knocked Him Hard enough so He never wakes up. Ps there is still time ???

  4. The man is garbage. He is obsessed with money and he put it before anything else including his own fighters.,whom he did little for. The man is a textbook example of a sociopathic financial predator.

  5. Gerald McClellan was put into a coma because of King and King said he "lost like a dog". McClellan was blind and paralyzed for the rest of his life

  6. At the end he says he's not asking to be loved he's asking for respect well guess what? He deserves none of that shit. He deserves a one way ticket straight to Hell.

  7. I'm not a Don King fan, but he was 86 at the time if this video.
    Let's see what you, or anyone else, are doing when you're 86.
    Come on now.

  8. I follow boxing 🥊 big don what a joke likes putting his whole arm in your pocket and take it all let boxing leave him ,

  9. Instead of Mike knocking out his opponents for money, he should have knocked out don king for even more money. Thith guy ith a thnake in the grath

  10. Don King is The most Disguting NEGRO of all NEGROS . BURN in hell , hope you dont die yet so you could suffer long.

  11. How this reptile of a man outlived the great Muhammad Ali is both a mystery and a stain upon the world of boxing

  12. What a character

    Killing people robbing people

    Yet put on some of the biggest fights of all time

    You can’t make this up if you wanted to lol

    Only in America

  13. HONESTLY THOUGH: I'm surprised Don King hasn't turned up in a shallow grave in the middle of the Vegas dessert somewhere. But hey, there's still time. The Devil doesn't wear a blue dress, the Devil wears a Don King blown-out hairdo. F DK. 🖕🏽🖕🏽

  14. King turd is something that you scrape off the bottom of your shoe if you have the misfortune to step in it

  15. When he stuck his hand in Mike Tyson's pocket it was the end days fucking career American loves Mike Tyson

  16. i can save you 5 minutes. He took advantage of your favorite boxers from the 80's-00's (probably sooner) and the boxing industry finally had a enough of his crap. No big names wanted to do business with him.

  17. That crook stolevalot but the lird shows him mercy over & over. He's a con artist. never thought a street was named after but it was erased after he killed a man on that same street.

  18. Scumm Of The Earth. This Guy Is The Biggest. Leech Lier, Con Artist Bull Shit Artist. And The Biggest Cunt . Ripped Off So Many Boxers.Slimey, Piece Of Shit.

  19. He is 88 years old and a world figure of pro boxing history no matter what we judge. Tyson gets tons of love from people worldwide (including me) and King not. So in my opinion Tyson is far richer.

  20. Donald King (born August 20, 1931) is an American boxing promoter known for his involvement in historic boxing matchups. He has been a controversial figure, partly due to a manslaughter conviction (later pardoned), and civil cases against him.

    King's career highlights include, among multiple other enterprises, promoting "The Rumble in the Jungle" and the "Thrilla in Manila". King has promoted some of the most prominent names in boxing, including Muhammad Ali, Joe Frazier, George Foreman, Larry Holmes, Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, Julio César Chávez, Ricardo Mayorga, Andrew Golota, Bernard Hopkins, Félix Trinidad, Roy Jones Jr., Azumah Nelson, Marco Antonio Barrera. Some of these boxers sued him for allegedly defrauding them. Most of the lawsuits were settled out of court.

    King has been charged with killing two people in incidents 13 years apart. In 1954, King shot a man in the back after spotting him trying to rob one of his gambling houses; this incident was ruled a justifiable homicide. In 1967, King was convicted of nonnegligent manslaughter for stomping one of his employees to death. For this, he served three years and eleven months in prison. In 1983 he was pardoned by Ohio Governor James A. Rhodes.

  21. In 2005 King launched a $2.5 billion defamation suit against the Walt Disney Pictures – owned ESPN, the makers of SportsCentury, after a documentary alleged that King had "killed, not once, but twice", threatened to break Larry Holmes' legs, cheated Meldrick Taylor out of $1 million, and then threatened to have Taylor killed. Though the documentary repeated many claims that were already made, King said he had now had enough. King's attorney said "It was slanted to show Don in the worst way. It was one-sided from day one, Don is a strong man, but he has been hurt by this."[

    The case was dismissed on summary judgment with a finding that King could not show "actual malice" from the defendants, and that King had failed to prove that any of the challenged statements were false. King appealed the decision and, 3 years later, the Second District Court of Appeals upheld the summary judgement, but disagreed with the original finding that none of the statements were false. In any case, Judge Dorian Damoorgian ruled, "Nothing in the record shows that ESPN purposefully made false statements about King in order to bolster the theme of the program or to inflict harm on King"

  22. Lennox Lewis
    In May 2003, King was sued by Lennox Lewis, who wanted $385 million from the promoter, claiming King used threats to pull Tyson away from a rematch with Lewis.

    Chris Byrd
    In early 2006, Chris Byrd sued Don King for breach of contract and the two eventually settled out of court under the condition that Byrd would be released from his contract with King.

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